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Thanks to students taking part in a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the UA, members of the Tucson community got to ride along in a driverless car.

"It feels like there is actually someone driving it, but it was eerie to see that nobody was next to me," Elizabeth Curbelo, business manager in the University of Arizona electrical and computer engineering department, told news reporters.

Eight students from universities in Arizona, California, Maryland, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia tested their summer research on the Cognitive Autonomous Test vehicle, or CAT vehicle, during a demonstration at a UA parking lot on Tuesday, Aug. 12. Students, faculty and staff, friends and others in the Tucson community watched -- and rode.  

The students -- whose research projects ranged from designing path-following controllers to using spinning lasers to detect obstacles -- were part of a 10-week NSF program that competitively selects a small number of students from colleges around the nation to experience the world of research. 

Electrical and computer engineering associate professor Jonathan Sprinkle, who won an NSF Career Award in 2013 and whose research in complex autonomous systems is internationally... Read Complete Article



Eight engineering and computer science undergraduates from throughout the United States have been working this summer to advance driverless car technology. Using the UA’s Cognitive and Autonomous Test, or CAT, vehicle, they will put their research to the test on Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014 as they demonstrate their projects. 

The students -- whose projects ranged from designing path-following controllers to using spinning lasers to detect obstacles -- will be available during intervals to answer questions about their research. Faculty, administrators and students participating in other summer research programs across the campus will attend, and the public is invited to see the driverless car in motion.

The demo will be from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. in UA parking lot No. 3039, adjacent to electrical and computer engineering and south of architecture, near Second Street and North Palm Drive.

The students, who otherwise may not have had opportunities to participate in a high-profile research project, were selected from among 70 applicants for the 10-week National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the University.

The program was run by electrical and computer engineering associate professor Jonathan Sprinkle, who won an NSF... Read Complete Article



College of Engineering faculty have revamped ECE175, a prerequisite for all ECE majors as well as a number of other Engineering majors. The new class structure incorporates more discussion, one-on-one help, hands-on activities and team projects. Photo by Adam Blumer.

UA electrical and computer engineering professors are switching things up to better engage students in large classes. And their efforts, part of a national program to improve STEM education, are paying off.

While lecture halls can accommodate the hundreds of students who take introductory classes, traditionally they do not encourage active student participation, which is key to improving science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, education.

As part of a UA initiative supported by the American Association of Universities, College of Engineering faculty... Read Complete Article



The mixed-major group of five women and three men beat two teams from the University of California, Merced, in the first such contest hosted by the Pacific Gas & Electric Co./NSBE Network.

College students often have several months to prepare for national competitions. Team members from the UA chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, for which electrical engineering student Maryam Abdul-Wahid serves as president, had only two, and they went on to win the 2014 NSBE Undergraduate Technical Research Competition in March. 

With an ingenious application of the bicycle dynamo light principle to improve gas pipeline inspection robots,

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University of Arizona College of Engineering