News Archive

Spectators at Student Demo Take a Spin in UA Driverless Car Thanks to students taking part in a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the UA, members of the Tucson community got to ride along in a driverless car."It feels like there is actually someone driving it, but it was eerie to see that nobody was next to me," Elizabeth Curbelo, business manager in the University of Arizona electrical and computer engineering department, told news reporters.Eight students from universities in Arizona, California, Maryland, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia tested their summer research on the Cognitive Autonomous Test vehicle, or CAT vehicle, during a demonstration at a UA parking lot on Tuesday, Aug. 12. Students, faculty and staff, friends and others in the Tucson community watched -- and rode.  The students -- whose research projects ranged from designing path-following controllers to using spinning lasers to detect obstacles -- were part of a 10-week NSF program that competitively selects a small number of...
Driverless Car Hits the Road Eight engineering and computer science undergraduates from throughout the United States have been working this summer to advance driverless car technology. Using the UA’s Cognitive and Autonomous Test, or CAT, vehicle, they will put their research to the test on Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014 as they demonstrate their projects. The students -- whose projects ranged from designing path-following controllers to using spinning lasers to detect obstacles -- will be available during intervals to answer questions about their research. Faculty, administrators and students participating in other summer research programs across the campus will attend, and the public is invited to see the driverless car in motion.The demo will be from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. in UA parking lot No. 3039, adjacent to electrical and computer engineering and south of architecture, near Second Street and North Palm Drive.The students, who otherwise may not have had opportunities to participate in a high-profile research...
Retooled UA Engineering Course Makes the Grade UA electrical and computer engineering professors are switching things up to better engage students in large classes. And their efforts, part of a national program to improve STEM education, are paying off.While lecture halls can accommodate the hundreds of students who take introductory classes, traditionally they do not encourage active student participation, which is key to improving science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, education.As part of a UA initiative supported by the American Association of Universities, College of Engineering faculty have revamped ECE175, a prerequisite for all ECE majors as well as a number of other Engineering majors. The new class structure incorporates more discussion, one-on-one help, hands-on activities and team projects. “It is becoming more and more evident that students in all types of classes at all levels need interactive, hands-on learning for success,” said associate professor Loukas Lazos, who has taught the prerequisite...
UA National Society of Black Engineers Wins Robotics Contest College students often have several months to prepare for national competitions. Team members from the UA chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, for which electrical engineering student Maryam Abdul-Wahid serves as president, had only two, and they went on to win the 2014 NSBE Undergraduate Technical Research Competition in March. With an ingenious application of the bicycle dynamo light principle to improve gas pipeline inspection robots,For the full story, click here. 
1885 Distinguished Scholar Award Recognizes ECE's Ivan Djordjevic Electrical and computer engineering associate professor Ivan Djordjevic was recently named an 1885 Distinguished Scholar. The 1885 Society recognized Djordjevic, who has a joint appointment in the College of Optical Sciences, for transformative advancements in how large data sets are transmitted via the Internet and wireless optical networks and for his contributions to undergraduate and graduate instruction.“I am honored to be selected by the 1885 awards committee,” said Djordjevic, who, along with two other University of Arizona faculty members, was notified of the award in May 2014. “This will increase my visibility at the university level as well as nationally and internationally.”The 1885 Society Distinguished Scholars Award, created in 2012, acknowledges outstanding mid-career faculty whose leadership, research, scholarship and creative contributions promise to advance their respective disciplines.“Ivan Djordjevic’s commitment to student engagement and research make him an...
Cost-Limiting Temperature Controller Set for Market By Karina Barrentine, UA College of EngineeringResearchers at the University of Arizona, with the support of Tech Launch Arizona, are one step closer to giving consumers something they’ve never had before: a way to easily and instantly make informed decisions about the tradeoff between comfort and the cost of electricity for heating and cooling, which typically accounts for half of a home’s electricity bill.Associate professor Jonathan Sprinkle and a team of researchers in the electrical and computer engineering department have developed a monitor that works with a Wi-Fi enabled thermostat to automatically manage temperature settings based on how much consumers choose to spend on electricity, not just on how cool or warm they want to be at any given time.Unlike smart thermostats that expect consumers to reduce energy consumption by choosing set points using their intuition of savings, this technology translates thermostat changes into dollars before the electricity bill lands in the...
UA Leads Multi-University Team in Optical Computing Research Overcoming limitations in digital electronic computing will likely involve creative solutions, especially when it comes to big-data tasks in science, health care, business and defense. With a recent $7.5 million U.S. Department of Defense award, electrical and computer engineering professor Mark Neifeld, who has a joint appointment in Optical Sciences, is leading a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, or MURI, project to help find those solutions. The team is examining how optical technology can be used to advance computing speed and power. “Current digital electronic computing technology is reaching its limits in cost and capacity,” said Neifeld, “and alternatives are needed to solve these problems.”Optics in computing allows for higher bandwidth and massive parallelism, or many processors working in conjunction to perform a set of computations, Neifeld explained, making it a better option for handling some of the more complex computing tasks, such as weather...
Start-up Codelucida to Clean Up Computer Memory By Paul Tumarkin, Tech Launch ArizonaWith the big data industry booming and technology companies incorporating flash memory into all kinds of devices, the demand for reliable, solid-state memory is growing at an exponential rate. Codelucida, a new start-up company based on a technology developed in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona and the University of Cergy-Pontoise in France, aims to bring new levels of accuracy and efficiency to these solid-state drives (SSDs). To bring their invention to market, the inventors worked with Tech Launch Arizona, the UA unit that advances academic discoveries, developing them into intellectual property, inventions and marketable technologies.“The technology we’re developing is relating to decoders and how you retrieve information on SSDs,” explains Bane Vasić, Ph.D., co-inventor and UA professor of electrical and computer engineering. “As errors happen, you not only need an algorithm to correct...
College of Engineering Honors ECE Administrative Associate ECE administrative associate Nancy Emptage was awarded the William Primm Cosart Prize at the 2014 College of Engineering Faculty and Staff Awards Luncheon. The award honors staff for exceptional service in support of the College’s mission.“Based on her long-term experience as an administrative assistant, Nancy is well-versed in all areas of faculty support and beyond,” said ECE associate professor Wolfgang Fink, who nominated Emptage for the award. “Nancy always goes beyond the call of duty and walks the extra mile.”Emptage began working at the UA in 1983 at the Steward Observatory as a secretary. Since that time, she has worked in a number of colleges and departments on campus, including Optical Sciences, atmospheric physics, mathematics, landscape architecture and most recently electrical and computer engineering. “Being able to help the faculty, other staff and students in the department and college is a pleasure and a privilege,” Emptage said. “I am grateful to those who...
Kelly Simmons-Potter Named Fellow of American Ceramic Society Electrical and computer engineering professor Kelly Simmons-Potter has been named Fellow of the American Ceramic Society (ACerS), one of the highest levels of membership in the organization. She will be recognized at the society’s 116th Annual Meeting in October 2014 for her research in photosensitive materials and radiation-hardened optics and for her extensive service to the society.“I am both honored and delighted to receive this distinguished recognition,” said Simmons-Potter.Simmons-Potter, who joined the UA in 2003, has joint appointments in the College of Optical Sciences and in the department of materials science and engineering. She also serves as director of the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy, or AzRISE, which focuses on research, curriculum and outreach in solar and renewable energy. Her research explores the linear and nonlinear responses of optical materials and devices to both ionizing and nonionizing radiation, as well as how defect physics affects the...
Fulbright Professor Set to Help Advance Research in Australia Richard Ziolkowski, UA professor of electrical and computer engineering, is no stranger to traveling the world as a representative for the College of Engineering. And starting in January 2015, he will once again represent the College as he flies across the globe to begin work in Australia as a Fulbright Distinguished Chair.Ziolkowski will serve a five-month term as the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Advanced Science and Technology working with the country’s Defence Science and Technology Organisation to help connect government work and educational research. Based in Melbourne, he will work on DSTO priority research projects as well as give guest lectures and attend seminars at universities throughout Australia.A key benefit of the program is the opportunity to explore longer-term collaboration and create new links with institutions in Australia. Thus, his time in Australia, Ziolkowski said, will align well with the College of Engineering’s global initiatives and help strengthen...
Tech Launch Arizona Recognizes ECE Professor with Catapult Award Jonathan Sprinkle, assistant professor in the electrical and computer engineering department and inventor of the cost-controlling thermostat, recently received the first-ever UA Catapult Award in Engineering.Sprinkle was one of four faculty members who received a 2014 Catapult Award from Tech Launch Arizona, a UA organization that helps move inventions and intellectual property from the lab to the marketplace. The awards honored faculty who are bridging the gap between research and consumer needs.With support from TLA, Sprinkle has filed invention disclosures on his closed-loop cost-controlling thermostat and created a startup company, Acomni LLC, to support the technology. The thermostat enables homeowners to decide temperatures based on their budgets.Sprinkle also was recognized last year with a Career Award from the National Science Foundation for his research in cyberphysical systems.
Honor for Ecosystem Impact Goes to Patrick Marcus Alum Patrick Marcus, president of Marcus Engineering LLC, has received the 2014 Tech Launch Arizona Catapult Award for Ecosystem Impact.The award, which Marcus received during a March 24 ceremony, recognized his work as a “community connector” bringing people together through a variety of efforts, including teaching children engineering, participating at the Arizona Center for Innovation and creating public art installations. Marcus, who earned his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering in 1999 and his doctorate in biomedical engineering in 2006, serves on advisory boards for the College of Engineering and the Arizona Center for Innovation, and the board of the UA Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance. He founded Marcus Engineering, a Tucson electronics firm that supports product development for medical devices and instrumentation, in 2011.
Department Bids Farewell to Two Long-term Contributors Two long-term members of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering – associate professor Harold “Skip” Parks and administrative secretary Caroll Mainvielle – are retiring after more than two decades of service at the University.“We are sad to lose two outstanding members of the department, but we share in their joy during this exciting time for them,” said Tamal Bose, department head.  Parks began teaching at the UA in 1990 and has focused on semiconductor devices and solid state physics, among other research interests. Some of his proudest career moments include serving as director for the University of Arizona SEMATECH Center of Excellence for Contamination/Defect Assessment and Control from 1990 to 1995 and as an editorial board member for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Circuits and Devices Magazine from 1999 to 2006. Perhaps his proudest accomplishment, Parks said, has been sharing his love for teaching with his students. “When I...
National Design Magazine Honors ECE Graduate as Rising Star Design News Magazine has named Robbie Laity, a 2013 electrical engineering graduate, "one of our nation’s rising design stars."The magazine published its annual list of stars in January. Nominees were chosen based on their ability to stay ahead of the trends, significantly perform in their industry and outperform their peers. Patrick Marcus, president of Marcus Engineering, a Tucson electronics firm that supports product development for a variety of industries focusing on medical devices and medical instrumentation, nominated Laity for the award.Laity interned at Marcus Engineering while he was a student at the University of Arizona and is now an electrical engineer with the company. "We are so proud to have Robbie as part of the team. He’s a brilliant and generous engineer," said Marcus, a UA alum who earned his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering in 1999 and his doctorate in biomedical engineering in 2006. "Recognition like this proves that we are doing the...
Agilent's $20M Software Donation Helps Give Students an Edge in the Job Market Thanks to a $20 million design software donation from Agilent Technologies, UA engineering students have a new tool to help get them certifiably ready for the work world.As part of its RF and Microwave Industry-Ready Student Certification Program, Agilent has donated Agilent EEsof Electronic Design Automation, or EDA, software for UA students to download onto their personal computers.“Experience with the software will give students an edge in the job market,” said Kathleen Melde, professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering, who regularly uses Agilent products in her labs and classes.“Our goal is to prepare our students to be industry ready, and this certification program helps students gain the recognition they need to stand out to employers,” she said. “This program makes our students more competitive, and eventually helps them get the jobs they want.”The program identifies, acknowledges and rewards top students for meeting certain requirements that qualify...
New Retinal Implant Technology Aims to Restore Sight Wolfgang Fink, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering, and his research team are working on new implant design and methods of electrical stimulation of the retina that will enable implants to produce much clearer images and help people who have lost their sight see more than just light and vague shapes.“Current technologies and methods are far behind what can be done,” said Fink, who is working with Tech Launch Arizona to patent the new technology and license it to retinal implant developers.Fink also leads a team of engineers who designed an imaging device that could be key in the search for life forms on other planets. The system, which was made from a point-and-shoot camera, was featured on UANews this month. Read about the tool here. For more, see Breakthrough in Retinal Implants and Retinal Implants Get New Technology
SPIE Names Mark Neifeld 2014 Fellow Professor Mark A. Neifeld, who holds a joint appointment in electrical and computer engineering and optical sciences, has been named a 2014 SPIE fellow. SPIE is the International Society for Optics and Photonics.The fellowships recognize SPIE members for outstanding technical contributions within the organization.Neifeld was selected for his achievements in computational imaging, compressive sensing and applications of information theory. He has been a guest editor for the SPIE newsletter, co-chaired the Visual Information Processing Conference and served as a member of the SPIE executive committee, among other leadership roles.Neifeld, who joined the ECE faculty in 1991, has published more than 115 papers in peer-reviewed journals and obtained several patents from his research.  
International Cybersecurity Workshop Comes to Campus Knowing when and how hackers will strike and preventing and defending against cyberattacks is imperative to the security of nations, industry and individuals as pervasive cyberservices, such as cloud computing, revolutionize the way the world communicates and does business. The Second Franco American Workshop on CyberSecurity  -- set for Jan. 20 and 21, 2014 at the University of Arizona in the Santa Rita Room of the Student Union -- will highlight ongoing cybersecurity efforts and research in the United States and in Europe, including the newest UA cybersecurity projects: Hacker Web and AZSecure. Alongside industry professionals and experts from other universities, UA faculty will present research about resilient cloud services, securing smart grids and human-centric predictive analytics of cyberthreats, among other topics. Additionally, technology experts from IBM will introduce workshop participants to IBM’s global effort in supporting educational cybersecurity programs. The...
Joining Forces to Understand Motives Behind Cyberattacks Researchers combining cyberdata forensics and human-centric social network analysis to develop counter-strategies for cyberattacksA UA research group is working is testing whether cooperation between computational and social scientists can yield a breakthrough in predicting cyberattacks and identifying their sources.The ECE's Loukas Lazos and Jerzy Rozenblit, University Distinguished Professor and Raymond J. Oglethorpe Endowed Chair, are teaming with primary investigator Brint Milward, the Providence Service Corporation Chair in the School of Government and Public Policy, and fellow co-investigator Ronald Breiger, a sociology professor, to develop models of cyberattack characteristics, classify adversarial groups, and -- using social network science -- analyze those groups.See UANews story.
Breakthrough in Retinal Implants Expected to Restore Sight Retinal implants not living up to their potential, argues UA-German research teamECE associate professor Wolfgang Fink and Erich Schmid, professor emeritus at the University of Tübingen, Germany, have conducted a study on retinal implant design and electrical stimulation methods that could enable implants to produce clearer images.The research, presented in San Diego at the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Neural Engineering, indicates the advances could help people who have lost their sight due to degenerative diseases such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa see more than light and vague shapes. Engineering article ● TV news
DHS Awards Mark Neifeld Team $3.7 Million to Advance Detection of Bombs in Aircraft Baggage Most travelers checking their bags for a trip are thinking about getting where they are going. Not Mark Neifeld. He is thinking about how to develop better mathematical tools to improve baggage scanner bomb detection.Neifeld and his multidisciplinary team have been awarded $3.7 million, in two separate proposals, from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to advance X-ray detection of explosives, especially emerging homemade bombs, in checked baggage aboard commercial aircraft.Building on their U.S. Department of Defense work in KECoM, or Knowledge Enhanced Compressive Management, Neifeld’s research team will develop an information-theoretic system design, based on the mathematics of compressive measurements, to more efficiently detect explosives.Airport X-ray systems are not optimized for the detection of improvised explosive devices, explained Neifeld, who holds a joint appointment in Optical Sciences. They collect far more visual information than is needed because they do not...
Volume Holographic Imaging System for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer Reaches Milestone Raymond Kostuk and his research team have developed a bench-top version of an instrument capable of detecting ovarian cancer, a disease often referred to as the “silent killer” because it presents no symptoms until it is highly advanced.The bench-top version of the volume holographic  imaging system, which shows promise for detecting ovarian cancer in situ, uses specialized holographic components in a microscope to generate images capable of detecting subtle tissue microstructure changes as well as fluorescent bio-chemical signatures. Working with Dr. Kenneth Hatch, of the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine, and his consenting patients, as well as researchers in the BIO5 Institute, Kostuk and his co-investigator Jennifer Barton, who now holds the position of associate vice president for research at the UA, have completed a study of cancerous and non-cancerous ovarian tissue in which the imaging system successfully identified abnormal spatial and spectral markers of...
ECE-Led Team Forging the Future of Wireless ECE’s Tamal Bose Directs New Center's Pursuit of 5G Technologies - See more at: http://news.engr.arizona.edu/news/ua-led-team-forging-future-wireless#sthash.kaBJiadg.dpufTamal Bose Directs New Center's Pursuit of 5G TechnologiesImagine a future beyond 4G; a future beyond smart phones, exciting new apps, and high-speed wireless internet connectivity at home, work, school and in transit. Imagine a world  in which the heating and cooling of our homes is controlled from cell phones, where medical devices are wirelessly networked and surgeries performed remotely, where rural communities communicate just as quickly and reliably as urban centers, and where computing efficiently and securely in the cloud is second nature.Realizing that vision of effortless connectivity anytime, anywhere is dependent on the creative collaboration of many highly skilled and knowledgeable people, all focused on developing the next generation of reliable and sustainable broadband wireless technologies....
Three New Faculty Members Join Department in Fall 2013 Jinghong Chen, Associate ProfessorJinghong Chen joins the University of Arizona’s electrical and computer engineering department as an associate professor. He comes to the UA from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, where he was an associate professor in electrical engineering. Chen’s research focuses on the design of high-performance and highly-integrated mixed-signal and RF integrated circuits and systems for computing, communication, energy, biomedical, and sensor applications.Chen received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering in 2000 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his M.S. in 1997 from the University of Virginia. He also holds an M.S. and B.S. in engineering physics from Tsinghua University in Beijing.Onur Ozan Koyluoglu, Assistant ProfessorOnur Ozan Koyluoglu joins ECE as an assistant professor. He comes from the University of Texas, Austin, where he served as postdoctoral fellow.Koyluoglu’s research interests are in the areas of information theory,...
Two Faculty Members on Team for Multimillion-Dollar Quantum Key Encryption System for Navy $1.86 Million Award to Help Overcome Low Data Rates, Atmospheric InterferenceSix researchers at four universities, including the UA College of Engineering’s Mark Neifeld and Ivan Djordjevic, have won a multimillion-dollar Department of Defense award to explore quantum key encryption methods far more advanced than cryptography technology in use today.The five-year project, "Fundamental Research on Wavelength-Agile, High-Rate Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) in a Marine Environment," is a combined effort between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the project lead; Duke University; Boston University; and the UA.Quantum key distribution uses quantum mechanics to guarantee secure communication. It enables two parties to automatically produce a shared random secret key known only to them, which can then be used to encrypt and decrypt messages sent over a standard communication channel."One of the simplest approaches to QKD," Neifeld explained, "involves two parties sharing...
Robotic Car Gives Undergraduates Chance of a Lifetime Nevada, California and Florida recently passed laws allowing limited testing of self-driving vehicles on their state’s roadways. Google’s experimental driverless cars already are zipping around California’s Silicon Valley. Automakers like Audi, Toyota, Mercedes-Benz, Volvo and BMW are debuting prototypes of self-driving cars. And, undergraduates from across the country are at the University of Arizona this summer doing their part to make autonomous vehicles safe and reliable.Ten students from Alabama, Ohio, Utah, New York, Arizona, Massachusetts, West Virginia, Virginia and even as far away as Puerto Rico are participating in a 10-week College of Engineering summer program focused on advancing the UA’s Cognitive and Autonomous Test vehicle, or CAT vehicle.The program, Research Experiences for Undergraduates, is funded by the National Science Foundation and provides opportunities for undergraduates to work with faculty mentors and graduate students at universities throughout the United...
Design Project Gets Attention of TI Visionaries Acclaim keeps coming for a 2013 University of Arizona College of Engineering Senior Design team that included two students in the electrical and computer engineering department: Melvin Barney and Brian Suarez. The two helped design an award-winning disposable, low-power blood glucose meter, and their team is now headed to Dallas to compete in the 2013 Texas Instruments Analog Design Contest."We designed a glucometer that is much more accurate than other glucometers on the market, and it has the ability to transmit the glucose readings to an iPhone," said Barney, who expects to graduate in December.Glucometers help people with diabetes monitor and manage their blood glucose levels.Team Glucose is among only 10 teams selected from 125 teams throughout the United States and Canada to compete during the July 21-23 Engibous Summit, named after TI’s former chairman and CEO, Thomas Engibous. The winning team will take home $10,000; second place $7,500, and third place $5,000. A "People’s...
UA Professor Linda Powers Developing Rapid, Disposable Tests for Life-Threatening Blood-Borne Disease Building on research that sent her biking across Tanzania a couple of summers ago to test remote water sources on the spot for bacteria, University of Arizona Professor Linda Powers is moving into the diagnostic realm. The Thomas R. Brown Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering is developing fast, disposable blood tests for pathogens that cause diseases such as HIV and hepatitis.The novel technology for rapid pathogen detection in blood relies on the capture of the pathogens with specially designed binding mechanisms and the intrinsic fluorescent signatures of the live captured   pathogens.  "This will save time, work and expense when detection of blood-borne disease organisms is needed and other facilities are not available," said Powers, who holds appointments in biomedical engineering and electrical and computer engineering at the UA. "It quickly tells you the information you must know." Powers’ company, MicroBioSystems of Arizona, recently was awarded two Department...
Professor Hao Xin's DARPA Contract to Advance Bomb Detection and Breast Cancer Screening The kind of mayhem caused by homemade explosives, both domestically and overseas, likely will involve high-tech systems that can identify concealed bombs from a distance. With a recent $1.5 million U.S. Department of Defense award, University of Arizona researchers will adapt their breast cancer imaging research for detection of embedded explosives.Electrical and computer engineering professor Hao Xin, principal investigator on the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, award, says the same advanced technology he and his colleagues have been creating for early breast cancer detection is now being developed to rapidly detect explosives in opaque, or nontransparent, materials."We started our research in 2009 with no funding but kept working because we knew it would make a huge difference," said Xin, director of the UA Millimeter Wave Circuits and Antennas Laboratory. "Eventually we had some internal funding, and here we are today."The types of materials often used to...
UA Technology Innovation Award Recognizes Salim Hariri's Cyber-Nervous System, Entrepreneurial Contributions Salim Hariri, professor of electrical and computer engineering and UA site director for the National Science Foundation Center for Cloud and Autonomic Computing, is considered to be among the best of the best when it comes to University of Arizona innovators. Hariri, who has developed a cyber-nervous system to protect against cyber-attacks, and five of his UA colleagues recently received UA Technology Innovation Awards recognizing their entrepreneurial contributions.During the awards presentation and panel discussion on March 28, 2013, Hariri advised young researchers to focus on work that reaches the masses and makes a difference. The litmus test, he said, is whether the work will result in something “somebody can pick up and use.”Recent advances in computing, networking, software and mobile technologies have led to the development of cyber-resources, such as cloud computing, that are significantly changing the way we do business, maintain our health, conduct education, and entertain...
From Robots and Dreamliners, Engineering Computer-Based Systems Is Focus of Tech Tutorials For the tech community, upcoming IEEE Computer Society Conference in Scottsdale features ECBS tutorials on robotic systems, software security, and more.When Boeing had the unfortunate malfunction of its lithium-ion battery in its 787, engineers at the University of Arizona knew what could be grounding the Dreamliner. The airplane was an “example of a device that is so complicated and complex, that you don't know whether it works until you build it,” said Jonathan Sprinkle, UA professor of electrical and computer engineering and a chair of the upcoming 20th Annual IEEE International Conference and Workshops on the Engineering of Computer-Based Systems.Boeing’s troubles and other enterprises controlled by computers are part of a special class of technological challenges relating to the engineering of computer-based systems, or ECBS. Systems once handled by mechanical actions, such as turning on a light switch or shifting hydraulics midflight, now are calculated and performed by...
Jonathan Sprinkle Earns NSF Career Award, Involves Teens in New Modeling Techniques for Cyber-physical Systems Ask the UA’s Jonathan Sprinkle about recently winning a prestigious National Science Foundation Career award, and he’s likely to tell the story about an AutoCAD program and milling machine that came to his high school. The machine had nothing to do with the cyber-physical systems work for which Sprinkle is being recognized but everything to do with where he is today.The computer numerical control mill was set up to produce a single, flat Plexiglas key chain based on each student’s computer-aided drawing. But Sprinkle and a friend hacked the software and reset the machine to cut a 3-D figure of a sports car then output dozens of copies. More importantly, the experience propelled Sprinkle into the world of engineering."I never would have been an engineer if that $500,000 key chain maker had not come to my high school," he said.That’s why as part of his research, Sprinkle, an assistant professor in the electrical and computer engineering department, will give the keys of a full-size...
Longtime IT Manager Wins Top UA Employee Award Leo Enfield, College of Engineering information technology manager, sees himself as just a cog in the wheel of a machine that makes the UA one of the world’s great research universities.  But the fact is he represents the best of the best among University of Arizona staff. At an institution with 15,000 employees, Enfield alone was singled out to receive the 2013 Billy Joe Varney Award for Excellence. The Billy Joe Varney Award is named for a man who dedicated three decades of service to the University of Arizona, who always put the larger good of the University before his own personal gain, always went the extra mile,and always made others feel special. The award is given annually to one UA employee who has at least 15 years of continual service to the University and who lives and acts in the spirit of the man for whom it was named.Leo has shown identical qualities over the past 20 years," said College of Engineering Dean Jeff Goldberg. "He has worked hard, learned a great deal...
Jonathan Sprinkle Discusses the Advantages and Challenges of Mobile Health Applications Below is what was published on the Arizona Public Media website in a story by Georgia Davis:mHealth, short for mobile health, is the new buzzword in health care and research. It refers to the practice of medicine and health with the assistance of mobile devices.Jonathan Sprinkle, a professor in the the University of Arizona Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a member of the UA Mobile Health Special Interest Group, said the work is a "chance to make impact, to help someone or to make a new application that will help someone to transform their health.In addition to connecting doctors and patients in new ways, mHealth is assisting researchers, who can collect data from individuals through their phones, computer tablets and other mobile technologies.Perhaps one of the biggest challenges is bringing computer and electrical engineers into conversation with medical researchers. This is focus of the UA special interest group which now holds annual conferences to discuss...
Marwan Krunz Chalks Up Another Award Marwan Krunz, a professor in the UA department of electrical and computer engineering, continues to amass awards and lead research in communications technology and networking. Most recently, the Communications Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, or IEEE, named Krunz a 2013-2014 distinguished lecturer.“I am humbled by the company I am in: some of the world’s most accomplished researchers in communications technology,” said Krunz of the prestigious and highly competitive honor.The two-year appointment recognizes renowned authorities in their fields and funds worldwide travel for speaking engagements. Krunz’s research emphasis is on optimal resource allocation, adaptive control, and distributed protocol design. Among his planned speaking topics is dynamic spectrum access, or DSA, models to remedy the lack of available wireless spectrum.“This is an opportunity to share with more schools what we are doing here at the UA in a more formalized way,” said Krunz....
Alumni Get Glimpse of What's Next for Gigapixel Camera They have shown the world it can be done. Now researchers are working through the challenges created by a camera that generates images so big the equivalent of 500 high-definition displays would be needed to view a single image in its entirety.A multidisciplinary team of 40 researchers from Duke University, the University of Arizona, and the University of California--San Diego, as well as a number of industry partners working daily for three years built a camera that can take gigantic pictures with five times as much detail as a person with perfect 20/20 vision can see. The camera could revolutionize space surveillance, image security, microscopic surgery, and video broadcasting, among other areas.The gigapixel camera, dubbed AWARE-2, has 100 times as many pixels as most point-and-shoot cameras. Pixels are the smallest component of a digital image.  The more pixels, the clearer, or more highly resolved, an image.Before the gigapixel camera, a few enormously detailed...
Distinguished Professor Jerzy Rozenblit to Take TEDX Stage Laparoscopic, or minimally invasive surgery, may be much easier on the patient, but that isn’t necessarily so for the surgeon. Laparoscopic surgeries are more challenging than conventional surgeries because of the restricted vision, hand-eye coordination problems, limited workspace, and lack of tactile sensation. Thus, laparoscopic surgery can be more difficult for medical students and residents to master, says Jerzy Rozenblit, a UA Distinguished Professor and Raymond J. Oglethorpe Endowed Chair in the electrical and computer engineering department.Rozenblit, in collaboration with the Arizona Simulation Technology and Education Center, is developing virtually assisted surgical training systems and computer-guided techniques to help minimize the challenges and improve surgical outcomes for patients. The Distinguished Professor, who holds a joint appointment in the College of Medicine’s department of surgery, will be the next speaker at TEDX Tucson on Tuesday, February 26, at 6:30 p.m....
Team Headed to Market with Cost-Limiting Thermostat Jonathan Sprinkle, Susan Lysecky and their research team have developed a heating and cooling thermostat that enables homeowners to decide temperatures based on their budgets. The cost-limited thermostat means no surprises when the electric bill lands in the mailbox, at least not for energy used to cool and heat a home, which typically accounts for more than half of a homeowner’s utility bill, according to the U.S Department of Energy.“Most people just set their thermostat temperature in the desired range then get a bill at the end of the month with no understanding of how they correlate,” said Sprinkle, adding that here in Tucson, where summertime sees most days above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, it is not uncommon for homeowners to pay $250 to $300 or more a month for electricity. Sprinkle, an assistant professor, was a graduate assistant at Vanderbilt University and postdoctoral researcher at the University of California-Berkeley before joining the UA department of electrical and...
NSF Innovation Award and Startup Tucson 2012 Win Give Grad Student Entrepreneurial Workout One thing engineering students discover when the entrepreneurial spirit moves them is that they need to get out of the lab and into the world to find out what people really want. So says University of Arizona electrical and computer engineering doctoral candidate Xiao Qin.“I’ve learned to ask questions like, ‘How am I going to make a product people will use in their daily lives?’” said Xiao, whose National Science Foundation and Startup Weekend Tucson teams both recently won first-place awards.Xiao’s experiences with an NSF Innovation Corps training program last summer and Startup Tucson’s entrepreneurial marathon the first weekend in September not only helped him learn the business skills needed to introduce a product to market, they also helped the self-proclaimed shy guy overcome his uneasiness.The NSF Innovation Corps, or I-Corps, is a series of activities that help foster the commercialization of select, NSF-funded, basic-research projects. As part of an eight-week I-Corps...
Former Astronaut Presents Scholarship to ECE Senior One lived in space. The other is immersed in a world of computers. Both value those moments in time when everything just seems to come together. Together the two served as inspiration for more than 150 University of Arizona students, faculty and support staff during a recent Astronaut Scholarship Foundation check presentation.Former Skylab astronaut and U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame member Ed Gibson was on campus Sept. 12 to present UA College of Engineering senior Casey Mackin with a $10,000 scholarship. “I am sure our nation couldn’t be in better hands,” said Gibson, describing Mackin and 25 other 2012 Astronaut Scholarship recipients nationwide. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation is a national nonprofit organization that promotes the retention of college students in the science and technology fields.Mackin, an electrical and computer engineering honors student, works on the UA Data Adaptable Reconfigurable Embedded Systems, or DARES, project. He is helping develop ways to improve...
Conference Room Dedicated to Entrepreneur Tom Brown Appreciation for a man who has been described as an Edisonian engineer, a one-man whirlwind, homegrown entrepreneur, and the quintessential industry partner, was universally apparent on the faces of alumni and friends of the University at the recent dedication of the Thomas R. Brown Conference Room. In a fitting tribute to Brown, who with a lot of hard work and a bit of good luck morphed a garage startup into one of Arizona’s most successful high-tech electronics firms, UA President Ann Weaver Hart, in her inaugural visit to the electrical and computer engineering building, described the Burr-Brown years as a time when the “real rubber hit the road.” The ongoing public-private relationship between the University and the Brown family, Hart said, shows how we achieve dreams through shared resources. Tom Brown “truly understood the importance of that type of partnership: in recruiting and retaining the best faculty, in being able to give financial aid to the best students, and in...
ECE Professor Among Top 50 Authors in Applied Optics Mark Neifeld is one of the most prolific contributing authors for Applied Optics, a publication focused on applications-centered research in optics. On its 50th anniversary website, Neifeld is ranked at 37, with 45 articles published in the highly regarded journal.“Professor Neifeld is doing important work in the areas of optical processing systems and high-speed communications, with potential applications especially in aerospace and defense,” said Tamal Bose, head of the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) department. Neifeld directs the ECE Optical Computing and Processing Lab. Optical computing uses light (photons) instead of electricity (electrons) to process information. His research is focused on nontraditional imaging, pattern recognition and neural networks, parallel coding and signal processing, volume optical storage, and multiple-quantum-well photonics.He has co-authored more than 100 refereed journal publications on topics such as optical data storage, free-space...
Micro Air Vehicle Takes First Place in Germany A micro air vehicle flown by the team from the University of Arizona won first place in an indoor flight competition during a major international MAV conference.The UA Micro Air Vehicle club's micro aircraft, which specialized in autonomous vertical takeoffs and horizontal flight -- received the first place award during the International Micro Air Vehicle Conference and Flight Competition, or IMAV 2012, in the category of "Indoor Autonomy - Fixed Wing." The IMAV 2012 competition was in Braunschweig, Germany, in July 2012.The event was part of the conference that included 150 participants representing 15 countries. Attendees from all over the world shared ideas for improving MAV flight, a unique situation for the students to participate in, said Sergey Shkarayev, UA aerospace and mechanical engineering professor and UA MAV advisor.Micro air vehicles are small flying robots that can have the size and weight of small birds. Careful examination of bird and insect flight has greatly...
TCCC Honors Krunz with Outstanding Service Award University of Arizona professor Marwan Krunz of the UA department of electrical and computer engineering has been recognized this year by the IEEE Technical Committee on Computer Communications, or TCCC, for his outstanding service.Krunz's consistent high-quality service to the communications society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers -- including leadership of technical conferences and sustained editorial role for the technical journals that are central to the committee's mission -- has earned him the 2012 TCCC Outstanding Service Award. The TCCC focuses on computer networking and communication issues for the IEEE.Krunz's outstanding service award will be presented at the 2012 IEEE Computer Communications Workshop, Nov. 7-9, 2012 in Sedona, Ariz.The award honors Krunz's sustained excellent service to the committee, said Martin Reisslein, professor at the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University. "Marwan has served in...
Gigapixel Camera Captures Unprecedented Image Detail A new camera design consisting of a central lens surrounded by an array of microcameras heralds a new era of photography, enabling pictures of unprecedented detail.By synchronizing 98 tiny cameras in a single device, electrical engineers from Duke University and the University of Arizona have developed a prototype camera that can create images with unprecedented detail.In fact, the camera can capture images containing elements that the human eye cannot detect while taking the picture.As a comparison, most consumer cameras are capable of taking photographs with sizes ranging from eight to 40 megapixels. Pixels are individual "dots" of data – the higher the number of pixels, the better resolution of the image. The new camera has the potential to capture up to 50 gigapixels of data, which is about 50 billion pixels, more than 50,000 times more than megapixel cameras."A 50-gigapixel image is about 10,000 times bigger than an average desktop display. If you wanted to capture all that there...
Rovers featured on KOLD TV View full broadcast with Dr. W. Fink
Matt Bunting Segment on the Discovery Channel - Daily Planet Watch Episode
UA Engineer Launches Robotic Planetary Lake Lander Wolfgang Fink of the UA department of electrical and computer engineering has developed an autonomous robotic lake lander that could be used to explore this planet and others. Fink unveiled the lake lander, named Tucson Explorer II, or TEX II, in a paper titled "Robotic Lake Lander Test Bed for Autonomous Surface and Subsurface Exploration of Titan Lakes," which he presented March 8 at an aerospace conference organized by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Big Sky, Mont.Fink presented TEX II as an autonomous exploration vehicle that potentially could be used to explore the lakes of liquid hydrocarbon known to exist on Saturn's largest moon, Titan.TEX II is the second vehicle designed by Fink as part of his NASA-award-winning concept of future planetary exploration, which he calls "tier-scalable reconnaissance." The first vehicle was a land-based planetary rover.Fink envisions future planetary research being conducted by a hierarchy of intelligent,...
UA ECE Grad Student Gets IEEE Doctoral Research Award The Antennas and Propagation Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers recently awarded its 2011-2012 doctoral research award to Min Liang, a PhD student in the UA department of electrical and computer engineering.The annual award is only given to a few students worldwide and is based on their current research achievements and potential to become future leaders in the electromagnetics research community."I'm so honored to receive this award," Liang said. "It is not only a recognition of my recent work, but also an encouragement for me to continue to do my best in the future." The award includes a $2,500 fellowship.Electrical and computer engineering doctoral student Min Liang, left, and his PhD supervisor, ECE associate professor Hao Xin, who is director of the UA Millimeter Wave Circuits and Antennas Laboratory.Hao Xin, an associate professor in the electrical and computer engineering department who has been Liang's PhD supervisor since August 2010, said Liang...
UA Engineering Professor Connects His Work in Medicine and Space. He has joint appointments in the UA College of Engineering departments that deal with biomedical, electrical and computer, and systems and industrial engineering, as well as ophthalmology and vision science. The spectacled German native is a visiting associate in physics at the California Institute of Technology and holds professorships in ophthalmology and neurological surgery at the University of Southern California.Read full article >>
UA Engineering Professor Awarded Honorary Doctorate in Denmark Professor Richard Ziolkowski of the electrical and computer engineering department has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the Technical University of Denmark. In a Feb. 15 letter to Ziolkowski, the president of the Technical University of Denmark, Anders Bjarklev, wrote: "The Academic Council of our University ... has decided to confer upon you the degree doctor technices honoris causa, which is the highest honour our University can confer." Ziolkowski, who is the Litton Industries John M. Leonis Distinguished Professor, described the award as "a great honor." He said he was both happy and humbled by the award. "The list of previous recipients is rather daunting," he said "Some really famous engineers and scientists." Ziolkowski has several connections with DTU, many of them formed through his membership of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, of which he is a past president. He also served on the PhD committee for a visiting DTU doctoral student, Samel Arlanagic, with...
UA works on imaging breakthrough - Terahertz device First of its kind, fills gap in cell, chemical analyses  University of Arizona researchers are building a new kind of imaging device that could offer better ways to track cancer or detect explosives. The National Science Foundation recently awarded scientists at the UA College of Engineering $530,000 to develop a first-of-its-kind terahertz imager for medical and other uses. Under its Major Research Instrumentation Program, the NSF will fund the development of the terahertz spectral imager, to be housed in the University Spectroscopy and Imaging Facilities. The UA College of Engineering and Office of the Senior Vice President for Research added an additional $238,000, which brings the total project funding so far to $768,000. Richard Ziolkowski, UA professor of electrical and computer engineering, is the project's principal investigator. Linda Powers, UA professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering, will focus on the biomedical possibilities of the...
UA Student Robotic Rover Team Among Best in Nation By Pete Brown - June 24, 2011, 12:12 pm UA Engineering students recently won $10,000 funding to compete in a new NASA robotics competition.  Only seven teams in the nation qualified for the National Institute of Aerospace award, which enabled them to design and build a planetary rover and demonstrate its capabilities at the NASA Johnson Space Center's Rock Yard in Houston in May 2011. NASA's multi-acre Rock Yard, officially known as the Planetary Analog Test Site, simulates lunar and Martian landscapes and is used by NASA to test habitats, rovers, and spacesuits. NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace established the new student rover competition, snappily titled "Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts, Academic Linkage, Exploration Robo-Ops," aka Rascal, to test the robot-building skills of university students, and to spark interest in planetary rovers and robotics. The competition required the rover to negotiate obstacles and traverse difficult terrain, and...
Department Head Focues on Research Expansion, Curriculum Updates  Tamal Bose:  Specializing in Wireless, Hard-Wired for SuccessTamal Bose, an accomplished educator and researcher who in July joined the UA as head of the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) department, has a few plans in the works for capitalizing on the strengths of the department and making it more successful.Bose taught and researched wireless technologies at Utah State University and the University of Colorado for 18 years before moving east to Virginia Tech, where he directed wireless centers.“I have worked in several different university systems, so I have a global perspective on what things are important to move the department forward,” he said. “Overall, we need to capitalize on the tremendous talents of our faculty.” On Education: Reflecting the Needs of Society and Trends of IndustryThe most important job of educators is to motivate students from their very first day of classes, and professors who are excited about their work and fields have an infectious...
For They Are Jolly Good (IEEE) Fellows  By Pete Brown - December 7, 2011, 4:06 pm Three UA engineers were recently made fellows of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the world's largest technical professional association, with more than 400,000 members in 160 countries. The IEEE board of directors only confers fellowships upon engineers with an extraordinary record of accomplishments. The total number of fellows selected in any one year does not exceed one-tenth of one percent of the total voting membership. The new IEEE fellows for 2012 are Kathie Melde, professor of electrical and computer engineering; Bane Vasić, professor of electrical engineering and mathematics; and Scott Tyo, professor of optical sciences and electrical and computer engineering. IEEE cited Melde for contributions to tunable antennas and their integration in electrical packaging. She has spent her career on small antennas, establishing numerous patents, and her work has been used in many smart phone...
Students Treated to Display of UA Electrical and Computer Engineering Technologies By Steve Delgado - December 1, 2011, 3:15 pm Students with a passion for improved solar energy systems, medical imaging, vehicles that can drive themselves, small powerful antennas, and 3-D prototyping were treated to a rare simultaneous display of all these technologies by the University of Arizona electrical and computer engineering department Nov. 30 The best of UA electrical and computer engineering research was presented by the faculty who teach these applications and engineering designs to prospective students interested in learning more about these programs. All displays and demonstrations took place at the ECE building on the UA campus. The event delivered as promised: a better understanding of how graduates of UA ECE programs can improve quality of life for society through technology. Attendees had access to these faculty and their research technologies: Wolfgang FinkPlanetary rovers for extreme environmentsLinda Powers Rapid water assessment to prevent...
UA Engineer Goes Back Country Biking in Tanzania to Test Local Water Sources By Ed Stiles - September 7, 2011, 10:14 am Engineering professor Linda Powers spent part of her summer biking around Tanzania testing wells for bacteria using a unique instrument designed at UA. Fifty miles of dust and ruts separate Ifakara from the nearest paved road -- a distance more comfortably crossed by foot than rattling four-wheel-drive, if it weren't for the malarial mosquitoes. Tracks alongside this "road" bring a train to town twice weekly. There are few sanitary facilities and no municipal water system in this remote Tanzanian town. Ifakara and the surrounding region get water from open wells, the Kilombero River, and more than 100 deeper wells. Most of the open wells are hand-dug, shallow, and prone to contamination, while the drilled wells, which are capped and topped by hand pumps, can provide pathogen-free water. Despite their humble appearance, these hand pumps -- and the wells below them -- can be critical to public health. Water-borne diseases, such as...
Learning to Learn: We Have an App for That By Ed Stiles - May 6, 2011, 11:43 am Smart phone apps are hot today, but 10 years from now the trendiest techno gadget will be something completely different. That's why the real focus of this semester's software engineering class in electrical and computer engineering, ECE 473/573, isn't so much on developing the next great phone app, but on recognizing how to exploit the latest technologies and trends, said ECE professor Jonathan Sprinkle. "The most important take-away is that students should be able to teach themselves how to take advantage of new devices out there," Sprinkle said. "The devices you see as being hot on store shelves are always changing. So it's not enough to just learn about the latest device in school. You have to learn about how to learn about new things. That's the most important skill that any of our engineering graduates can learn, and that's really at the forefront of this class." Sprinkle has a reputation as a demanding instructor, but that didn...
Jerzy Rozenblit Appointed University Distinguished Professor By Pete Brown - September 2, 2009, 1:53 pm Professor Jerzy Rozenblit has been appointed University Distinguished Professor. The honor recognizes faculty who have shown a long-term commitment to undergraduate education and have made outstanding contributions at the University of Arizona. Rozenblit holds the Raymond J. Oglethorpe endowed chair and is head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Surgery. Professor Rozenblit’s research and reputation are internationally known and respected. He is considered a founding figure in the engineering of computer-based systems, and his work cuts across the boundaries of many disciplines, including surgery, anthropology, and theatre arts. His great passion, though, is teaching. During his 23 years at UA, he estimates that he has taught almost 5,000 undergraduate engineers. “It’s very rewarding,” he says. “I think this award reflects the commitment that I have...
Warp Power May Soon Add Extra Life to Your Cell Phone and iPod Batteries By Pete Brown - February 25, 2009, 11:04 am Assistant Professor Roman Lysecky of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has been awarded a grant of more than $400,000 by the National Science Foundation to develop high-performance customizable computer chips.  Lysecky’s research will focus on the emerging field of warp processing, which uses high-performance computer chips called field-programmable gate arrays, or FPGAs. Star Trek fans should note that Lysecky will not be setting up a “warp core” in his Embedded Systems Design Laboratory. Although warp processing certainly is about achieving very high speeds, it is also about achieving gains in power conservation, but exceeding the speed of light is not part of Lysecky’s research. “The original focus of warp processing was strictly performance,” said Lysecky. “My research proposal expands warp processing into a new domain of low power.” Some systems don’t actually need to be faster. Putting a warp...
UA Engineering Gets $2M from U.S. Army for Research into Computer Models of Unconventional Warfare  By Pete Brown - February 19, 2009, 12:55 pm The U.S. Army has awarded another $2 million to Professor Jerzy Rozenblit to fund phase 2 of a project to design intelligent software that can analyze the behavior and customs of political and cultural groups.  In 2007, the Army awarded Rozenblit $2 million to fund the recently completed phase 1 of the Asymmetric Threat Response and Analysis Project, known as ATRAP. Rozenblit holds the Raymond J. Oglethorpe endowed chair in electrical and computer engineering, and is head of that department.  In the context of armed conflict, “asymmetric” describes opposing forces that differ in terms of size, strength, resources, tactics, armaments, strategy, technology or motivation. Forging peace between such disparate belligerents has confounded negotiators for centuries.   The ATRAP software will enable intelligence analysts to build up three-dimensional maps of interactions between conflicting groups. By mapping...
da Vinci Circle Selects New Fellow da Vinci Circle Selects New FellowBy Pete Brown - January 27, 2009, 1:45 pm Bane Vasić has been named the 2008 da Vinci Fellow by the UA College of Engineering. Vasić is professor of electrical engineering and mathematics in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The fellowship is sponsored by the College’s giving society, the da Vinci Circle. Bane Vasić in the classroom.Fellows are selected for their substantial distinguished and sustained contributions to teaching, research and service. A new fellow is named each year, and each fellowship runs for two years. Fellows receive $10,000 during the two-year span of the appointment. Vasić is an alumnus of the University of Niš in Serbia, where he got his engineering diploma, master’s degree and doctorate in electrical engineering. “I go back to Niš every year to give a talk or teach a short course at the university and visit my parents and my brother, Bata," Vasić said. "My brother teaches...
Regents Professor Marcellin and His Students Get Top Billing at Telemetry Conference Regents Professor Marcellin and His Students Get Top Billing at Telemetry ConferenceBy Pete Brown - January 16, 2009, 3:04 pm Regents’ Professor Michael Marcellin gave the keynote speech at the October 2008 International Telemetering Conference in San Diego. While Marcellin entertained conference attendees with his keynote luncheon talk about digital cinema – An Overview of Digital Cinema: Are There Answers for Telemetry? – several of his students were busy sweeping up first and second place undergraduate student paper awards. First place went to Kristin Jagiello, Zafer Aydin, WeiRen Ng (students), William Ryan, Michael Marcellin and Ali Bilgin (advisors) for their paper, Joint JPEG2000/LDPC Code System Design for Image Telemetry. First place undergraduate student paper award (left to right): Wei-Ren Ng, Kristin Jagiello and Michael Marcellin.Second place was awarded to Andrea Chaves, Bruno Mayoral, Hyun-Jin Park, Mark Tsang, Sean Tunell (students), Michael Marcellin and Hao...

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